A Photographer’s Favorite Images From The Appalachian Trail

The 2018 Appalachian Trail hiking season is nearly upon us, and potential thru-hikers are setting off on an enormous journey. For me, having daily reminders of why I would even consider hiking 2000+ miles was important to my success. So, my fellow hikers, I present to you the top photos from my 2017 hike.

Strive not only to be inspired, but to inspire others.

The Great Smoky Mountains are one of the most amazing sections of the trail. For us, it was a moist and foggy environment, especially during the second half where views were incased by clouds.

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The south was filled with rolling grassy hills. One of my favorites was Buzzard Rock in southern Virginia.

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What is a walk in the woods without fauna…

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McAfee Knob is arguably the most iconic view on the entire trail. Capturing an epic photo took patience as the site was crowded with day hikers.

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After reaching Waynesboro, VA at mile 861.9, we decided to flip flop up to Maine. Along the way we spent some time in New York City!

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Maine… what can I say, except that it was without a doubt my favorite state.

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The famous Knife’s Edge atop Mt Katahdin.

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Less than a mile from the famous Antler’s Campsite in the 100-Mile Wilderness, you will find this gem: a sandy beach that turned out to be my favorite campsite on the entire trail.

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If you plan out your daily mileage right, you can camp on a lake nearly every night in Northern Maine.

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A little off-trail exploration was required to find this hidden gem, as there are no trails leading to it. Nearby you can camp in front of a huge waterfall and swimming hole. Look for it yourself, a little ways south from the Kennebec River Ferry.

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The beginning of the famous Mahoosuc Notch heading SOBO.

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Southern Maine had some of the best views of the entire trail. Make a point to stop and enjoy the scenery.

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Heading SOBO, the Wildcats are the first the four sections that make up New Hampshire’s White Mountains. The nearby town of Gorham, NH was home for two weeks as I recovered from a knee injury brought on by Southern Maine’s hellacious terrain.

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Another view of the Wildcats.

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The Presidential Range—another section of the roughly 100-mile White Mountains—was my second favorite part of the entire trail. In the distance you can see Mt. Washington which is rarely not covered in clouds.

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Another shot from the Presidential Range. It feels like something out of a Lord of the Rings movie.

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North Kinsman Mountain was one of only two times we cowboy camped. As you can see the result was something spectacular.

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Something every thru-hiker dreams of seeing. A full grown bull moose. This one took a stroll atop Mt Moosilauke, the last on-trail peak above 4,000 feet until Virginia (heading SOBO).

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Spending nine months on trail means you will see all four seasons. We chased fall throughout New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New York.

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Massachusetts offers the first open ridge walking in hundreds of miles after leaving New Hampshire.

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This view atop Bear Mountain in Connecticut was one of the last colorful views as cold temperatures and frequent light snows began to set in.

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Our last few weeks on trail through New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland saw daytime temperatures in the 30s and night temperatures in the low 20s or below. After reaching Harper’s Ferry, WV and completing 2028.6 miles of the Appalachian Trail, we decided to wait until May to finish the last 161.2 miles between Harpers Ferry, WV and Waynesboro, VA.

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Good luck to the class of 2018! We will see you out there in May as we tackle the Shenandoahs.

If you enjoyed the photography or would like to follow along on our upcoming adventures you can find me here:

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Comments 12

  • Kamakazee : Feb 13th

    Thanks so much. Those were/are some awesome photos. Makes me want to get out and explore more!

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      Thanks Kamakazee! Get out there and see it all for yourself!

      Reply
  • Dennis A Turner : Feb 14th

    Great Pics. Enjoy VA, my home state. DAT

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      Looking forward to the Shenandoahs!

      Reply
  • Pony : Feb 14th

    Beautiful photography, though it’s always a bit painful to realize I’m not on the trail…..

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      I feel the same way… we need to get back out there!

      Reply
  • Hummingbird Ellie : Feb 16th

    Thank you for sharing such beautiful photographs. They took my breath away! Now I really have a difficult time waiting until April and my time on the trail!

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      The wait sucks, but it will be worth it! Thanks!

      Reply
  • Sridhar Saraf : Feb 16th

    Awesome pictures! I feel like dropping everything and go for a long hike. Thanks for sharing Koty.

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      Not a problem! Get out there and hike!

      Reply
  • Samantha 'Clementine' : Feb 21st

    Your picture of the bull moose is AMAZING. I was on Mt. Moosilauke surrounded by fog so it’s nice to see that picture! I’m surprised to see moose at that elevation and that open.

    Reply
    • Koty Sapp : Feb 21st

      I was surprised as well. All of Maine and New Hampshire, up until that point, not a single moose. Last place I expected to see one, but what a site it was. Thanks compliment!

      Reply

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