Am I taking a Gun on the Appalachian Trail

One of the first things many people ask me when I say I’m getting ready to hike the trail is “Are you taking a gun?”.  To be fair, it’s one of the first questions I asked when I started researching.  So although the answer seems obvious to me now, it’s a normal question.  So, although I’m hardly the first to do so, I’m going to cover the topic today.

Long Story Short: no I will not carry a gun

Guns are Heavy

Listen, one of my number one concerns preparing to hike the trail is how much (or preferably little) my pack will weigh.  So I am not lugging a gun with me for more than two thousand miles.  Ain’t gonna happen.  My target pack weight is 12lbs.  A gun weighs around 5lbs.  So, despite being comfortable with American’s rights to own and carry guns, for me the trail is not a place to have one.

 

The Trail is Low Crime

There have only been a handful of murders on the Appalachian Trail since the 1970s, and it was likely less frequent before then.  This is certainly a lower crime rate than what I face in my home city.  Statistically, I’ll be safer on the AT than I am walking home from work.  As for robbery, I’ll reduce the risks for this by not taking jewelry and not camping near roads.  A gun is not something I would want to involve in a robbery anyways.

I Want Other Hikers to Hang out with Me

I’ve joined a lot of hiker forums and groups (such as the Trek, hey thanks for having me) and the general consensus is that guns have no place on the Appalachian Trail.  If you’re carrying a gun strapped to your pack people may well avoid you.  Best case scenario you’ll get a trail name related to the gun.  So carrying a gun might alienate me, but more than that carrying guns on the trail won’t foster the kind of community I want to see out there.  I want the Appalachian Trail to continue to be the kind of place where we don’t bring those kinds of outside concerns. Yes, we should be safe, stay in communication with other hikers as well as home, and hike away from people that give a bad vibe.

They’re Impractical

Okay, let’s say I’m in a scenario on the trail where I want to use a gun.  I wouldn’t want it if I was being robbed.  In the case of a robbery, I’m always just going to give up whatever I have because no physical possessions are worth my life.  So someone is trying to kill me or my dog, or abduct me somehow.  How is the gun going to help me?  If it’s inside my pack I’d have to unstrap it, dig through it, find the gun… It would be too late by the time I got it.  Even if it were strapped to the outside of my pack I’d have to get the pack off to get to it, and again we run into the problem of other hikers being deterred from sharing their company with me.

I Won’t Use it Everyday

There are so many “what-if” items I could take on the trail.  If I took all of them I’d never finish the trail because my pack would be too heavy to enjoy anything.  So I’ve come up with criteria things must meet to make it into my pack.  Do I need it to survive?  Does it have multiple functions?  Can something else in my pack replace this item?  Will I use it every day?  Actually, I could probably make a flow chart about this.  Expect a flow chart.

State Laws Vary

While it is now legal to carry a gun through national parks with the correct permits, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy discourages carrying firearms on the trail.  Then there’s the matter of having the correct permits for all the states, and having concealed carry permits.  Sure, I could carry a gun on my belt, but what about when I have my coat on, or my poncho?  Can I take it into shops?  For me, it’s not worth worrying about all of this.

Other Things I Won’t Carry

There are many things that people ask if I’ll be taking or suggest I should take.  I’m not taking most of them because I’m going minimalist.  Which is part of the essence of the trail.   In particular, I won’t be taking a knife, or bear spray, or any other sort of weapon.  Well, I might take a pocket knife for opening food packages or spreading peanut butter, but even that is iffy.  I’m getting close to putting up a finalized pack list though, so expect that soon.  (As final as a pack list can be this far out from my start date.)

What I will do to Stay Safe

I won’t hitchhike alone.  I will check in my family at home on a regular basis.  I’ll sign into log books, and read the log books to know what’s coming ahead.  The AT has a fairly tight community and during last year’s through hiking season I kept close tabs on many hiker forums, and saw how quickly reports of someone being suspicious or even disrespectful on the trail on the trail travels, and that hostel owners and ridge runners follow up on these reports to help make sure the trail is safe.  I will be acutely aware of my surroundings and move away from situations that seem off.  Finally, I plan to connect with other hikers and be a part of the community. We watch out for each other out there.

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Comments 303

  • Wow : Jan 4th

    ” So someone is trying to kill me or my dog, or abduct me somehow. How is the gun going to help me?”

    WOW, just.. wow!

    Reply
    • Joe D Ward : Jan 5th

      Never make it with a 12 pound pack and be self sufficient. Sorry.

      Reply
      • Griz Grizzleton : Jan 7th

        I had a 10lb base weight on the AT and was completely self sufficient. You obviously don’t have much experience long distance hiking.

        Reply
        • Chaz Chasteen : Aug 6th

          How 10lbs??? I’m trying to get down to 40!!! Please email me!!!

          Reply
      • bob easson : Nov 1st

        People who carry such light weight packs are short section hikers in the best of weather. Early Spring on the A.T. can be deadly cold. Don’t encourage people to take chances.

        Reply
        • Margaret : Nov 1st

          I guess what Griz didn’t mention in his comment is he had a 10lb baseweight for his thru-hike. He hiked the whole trail again this year, I’m not sure if he had the same baseweight.

          My baseweight also ended up being under 10lbs. I didn’t die or anything.

          Reply
          • Chaz Chasteen : Aug 6th

            How?? I would so appreciate you emailing me a list or something…I’m not creepy or anything just trying to get my pack weight down before I go on longer hikes

            Reply
            • Margaret : Aug 6th

              What’s your email?

              Reply
      • Jimmy : Aug 3rd

        carry everywhere you go and keep it accessible

        Reply
        • Barry chase : Nov 29th

          I agree, it’s totally stupid to not carry a weapon when hiking in the mountains. Shit happens, and it’s best to be armed. I don’t care for the company of snowflake liberals who find it not important to carry a gun. I’ve toted a weapon all my life and it’s saved me many times. From animals and people. Quite frankly, I trust a bear over most people.

          Reply
          • Bill : Mar 5th

            I don’t gun carry while hiking, but I do strap 2 sticks of dynamite to my chest just in case. One stick of dynamite only weighs 4oz, so it won’t weigh you down. Another lighter option is C-4 (plastic explosives). You can pick up dynamite for about $10 a lb., while C-4 explosives will set you back about $17 a lb. Both will serve you well on your hike, especially when being attacked by a huge group of bears, wolves or worse, a large group of non-toting liberals. 🧨

            Reply
            • B Schmidt : May 8th

              I never have needed a gun but i never leave home without one, and anyone who is so naïve to think its safe to go walking in the mountains and deep woods without one, probably isn’t reading this, because they are missing and provided a good dinner for a hungry bear or wolves. Or provided pleasures for a madman before he did away with them. My 10mm allows me to enjoy my adventure and in the event something tries to eat me or worse, I at least will have a chance to save my hide! Concealed carry means exactly that, no one ever sees it and it is always with me……..

              Reply
              • Joseph Feher : Aug 13th

                I have camped 600+ nights in the woods. Had a bear in camp more than once, which was scary but not deadly, saw plenty of bears, rattlesnakes, coyotes, raccoons, possums, turtles, deer, turkey, grouse, quail, and on and on. Hiked in rain, snow, hail, ice, and hundred degree humidity. I hiked up Cole mountain the night they pulled a body off it – suspected homicide – but with no suspect. The worst threat is bugs. Ticks will get you Lyme disease and a host of others. Mice will get you hanta virus, mosquitoes carry all kinds of pathogens. Nothing like swatting your arm and killing 20 mosquitoes at one swipe! People forget about the microbes, but microbes have killed more combatants in war than bullets. I suspect that is also true of thru hikers. You don’t need a gun on the AT. You need to know when it is OK to drink that water straight up and when you ought to filter it. Just like with water, you need a good filter for bad people, and stay away from them. We’ve all met that guy we’d rather be some miles away from. What you need on the trail is a friend or two.

    • Andrew : Jan 6th

      Yes. I was going to comment on the gun issue, but when I saw that this hiker didn’t even plan to take a knife necessarily, I realized that that was probably a completely inaccessible issue in her case.

      It’s difficult for me to imagine the mindset behind hiking 2000 miles without taking a knife. There’s no way I could explain to her the option of taking along a small handgun for personal protection.

      Reply
      • Margaret : Jan 6th

        I understand it’s an option, I just don’t believe it’s necessary.

        Reply
        • Harry Flashman : Jan 6th

          Nothing is ever necessary….until it’s actually needed. Hear how silly your argument is yet?

          Reply
          • Jason : Jan 7th

            Sure, murders have occurred on the AT, but more people have died due to falling coconuts. Do you wear a helmet at the beach too? You probably won’t need it…”until it’s actually needed”. Some people choose to live their life in a state of fear (I’m sure you call it “preparedness”), some people can assess the risks for what they are.

            Reply
            • Dan finn : May 15th

              I wish Ronald Sanchez was carrying a gun when the maniac threatened to light his tent in fire on Monday. Instead of being HACKED to death he would have protected himself.

              Reply
              • Eliezer Rodriguez : Oct 23rd

                Exactly …

              • Joe : Mar 4th

                I’ve hiked before but I’ve never height long enough to stay overnight I’ve been intrigued Lately by the idea of the Appalachian Trail simply because of the site’s the history and the outdoors my main concern is people looking to cause harm and most of all bears or mountain lions trying to attack so with that being said I would want to take my sidearm with me. I was wondering how difficult it would be to get permits for each state and would you have any tips for me along the way thanks

            • Steve Pierce : Aug 12th

              I respect your decision, but your weight estimate is WAY off. You can easily find a gun that ways less than a pound. Some can be had in the 6-7 oz range. And can easily be factored into a sub 10lb base weight.

              Reply
            • Eliezer : Oct 23rd

              The difference is that the coconut doesn’t make a conscious decision to attack me and it’s unlikely any coconut ever will. So taking the risk of not wearing a helmet is different than taking the risk of not having anything with which defend one’s life.
              The fact that some people are proactive in having a saying on how to defend their lives doesn’t mean that the “live in fear”, it simply means they make a conscious decision of having a means to defend themselves should they need arises to do so. You make a conscious decision of not doing so based on statistics. Two different approaches I guess. But labeling people who take a proactive approach as if they live in fear is a very simplistic view.

              Reply
              • Lrock : Dec 12th

                Agreed. It’s one thing to be a pacifist and another to be anti-gun.

            • Tom : Oct 4th

              In this day & age I would definitely pack a gun several Knives & a walking stick that the rubber end comes off to expose a spike Definitely have bear spray also Im not going to be anyones victim. Period.

              Reply
            • Mark : Nov 25th

              I take a gun and if someone trying to attack me while I’m on my tent I can defend my self, you’re going to run screaming for help and die.
              I’m not going to lying down near coconut trees.

              Reply
          • Steve Clarke : Dec 29th

            Not going to comment on anyone’s particular choices, but if you chose to make a public statement of facts, please get your facts straight. Do you have any idea what firearms weigh 5 lbs? In my opinion, a suitable firearm for the AT us about a pound. Do you need it? Will you ever need it? Those are unanswerable questions and one of the reasons I’ve carried on a daily basis for over 49 years. When you Google the question of firearms the first posting that pops up includes verbiage about having enough paper for the Taj Mahal. Another incorrect public statement. Most decent CCW states have reciprocity with every state on the AT except the Fab 5.MD,NH,NY,CT and MA. yes you can legally carry concealed or open in the other 9 states, yes you have to be aware of their state restrictions which in most cases are fairly common sense. My only decision is do I go through the expense of shipping a firearm around those states from one FFL to another, or not. Certainly make your own decisions on what gear you want to take but don’t expound falsehoods while doing so.

            Reply
            • KBCraig : Jul 3rd

              NH might not have as much reciprocity, but they honor 51 different carry licenses (including NYC and DC).

              Not that it’s needed. NH is a full “constitutional carry” state; no license is needed to carry a handgun loaded or unloaded, openly or concealed. There isn’t even a state minimum age to carry, and the only place off-limits by statute are courthouses (where they will happily check your gun at the door and give it back when you leave, as long as you’re not leaving in handcuffs).

              Reply
        • Jess : Jan 7th

          Margaret, no offense but your article sets up strawman arguments with how and why someone would carry a firearm or knife. By your criteria, knowing some basic self defense is not necessary, vigilance is not necessary and indeed more generally, extra water is not necessary, a med kit is not necessary, more advanced navigation tools are not necessary, etc.

          The media estimates of peer reviewed studies on how many crimes are prevented by non-LEO with firearms per year is about 1.7 million (estimates run from a low of 500,000 to a high of three million per year, per 2013 National Academy of Science metastudy, in National Academy Press). Now you certainly do not want to deploy a firearm if you are not reasonably threatened enough with bodily harm to use it, but in fact the data show over 99% of the time, simply showing the firearm stops a violent crime attempt.

          I’m with a federal agency, 5’6″, quite fit, and have trained in non weapons self defense, and still carry a small firearm to protect myself and my family when on hikes or camping whenever the law allows (and on the majority of the Appalachians the law allows it for both off duty LEO and for civilians). The fact is even in cities and dense towns responders arrive in time to interdict violent crime under 3% of the time. On the trail it is going to be 0% of the time.

          Setting up a strawman or red herring by (correctly) stating a handgun is not going to protect you 100% of the time and therefore of no utility or benefit, is not helpful to any discourse. The fact is, on average, it will make you safer to one degree or another.

          By the way consider a small .380, my backup/off-duty, with six rounds, weighs under one pound.

          Reply
          • Marty : Jan 8th

            Excellent response.

            Reply
          • Slade Zapp : Jun 17th

            Very well said, Jess. A lot of people still mistake that a .380 isn’t sufficient, which is incorrect. With the modern ammo available now, it has plenty of stopping power if you are competent and can put them on target. Underwood Ammo, Buffalo Bore, Hornaday, etc. I’ve carried a BG380 on the Colorado Trail and forgot I even had it in my pocket. When in Brown Bear country, it’s a Glock and bear spray. A little more weight but the piece of mind against both 4 and 2 leggers is worth it to me. Of course, I have a few less than lethal items, such as Fox Labs OC, knife, etc. I’ve trained in MMA since the mid 90’s (on and off) and can usually take care of myself in most situations, however idiots sometimes come in packs, and spray is worthless upwind. Never had to use any of it but the piece of mind makes for a happier hike – at least for me, and especially when I have family / kids.

            Reply
            • Penrod : May 25th

              Good reply. I’d go a bit further and say that as far as people-type predators are concerned, the caliber is nearly irrelevant. The reports I’ve read say that in 90% of the times a gun is used to stop a crime, the gun isn’t fired. So caliber doesn’t matter. In about 5% of the times, the gun is fired but the bad guy departs unwounded. So now we are at 95% of the incidents. In about another 5% of the incidents the bad guy is wounded to some degree: maybe in the pinky finger, the ear lobe, between the eyes, dead center. So in some subset of the last 5% caliber does probably matter, and possibly quite a bit.

              So in 95% of incidents, caliber doesn’t matter, and a .22, .25, or .380 would be just fine: it’s the presence of the gun and the owner’s proficiency and willingness to use it which stops the incident.

              I agree that a gun inside the pack, or strapped to the outside where it is inaccessible is pointless. It has to be available, and loaded, or what is the point?

              Reply
              • SamFreedom : Jun 25th

                Prepare for the worst, hope for the best. I want stopping power on the first shot, not the seventh.

        • Engine : Jan 14th

          Because it isn’t necessary. In 2017 Caboose and I knew a few hikers who started in Georgia with a gun in their pack. Without exception, they all sent it home within a month. I carry concealed in the real world, but would not consider it on a thru hike.

          Reply
          • Rick : Jul 19th

            They “sent them home” ? Hopefully they’re familiar with with the minefield of federal laws dictating the mailing of handguns.

            Reply
            • P : Mar 6th

              It’s really not hard, you just ship it to a FFL licensed person, how do you think guns get into the bajillion stores around the country? Shipping. You can buy a gun in a southern state like…lightning quick.

              You can just do it yourself with a FFL license, which you can just buy yourself if you’ve want to get once, or, as a part of all of the pre-planning involved with planning a thru-hike, I’m sure you could just make a request at your local gun shop, or one along the route, to accept your own firearm shipped to you around a certain date, they’re already receiving and holding a ton of guns every single day through the mail. Especially if the reason you’ve got for it is to be able to not deal with a state that doesn’t let you carry.

              Reply
          • Penrod : May 25th

            If I were carrying it in a pack I’d send it home too. There is no reason to have anything which, if needed, will be needed RIGHT NOW, if you are going to carry it inside a pack.

            Reply
        • ian : Aug 31st

          Until it is….If I were a woman I would DEFINITELY carry. I’m a pretty big guy so I’m good with my knife. Please at least carry a knife. You can just tell yourself you are bringing it to widdle when you’re bored. The safety of you and you’re dog should be a higher priority.

          Reply
        • CascadiaArmory : Nov 3rd

          Seatbelts are not necessary until they are. It is much better to be armed and not need it than need it and not be armed. Those of us who do carry every day feel a firearm is exactly like a seatbelt. An essential safety device. Just as I do not feel comfortable when I do not wear my seatbelt (which is pretty much never). I feel the same when I cannot carry my pistol. I feel that an essential safety device is not present. I especially feel that way when in the woods. We have cougar, wolves, bear, and coyotes here, not to mention two legged predators. I highly recommend taking some basic gun safety courses to familiarize yourself with firearms so they are not so frightening to you. There are many resourcy available. If you need help finding one I would be happy to assist. Have a great day.

          Reply
          • Margaret : Nov 4th

            I’m not frightened of guns. Are you always so condescending towards women or is it only women who are confident enough to do things that scare you?

            I’m also not scared of the dark and know that there aren’t wolves or cougars on the AT, and that black bears aren’t a threat to people.

            Of course if someone feels more comfortable carrying they should I have no objections. But it’s not necessary on the trail and there’s a reason the vast majority of through hikers don’t carry.

            How many long trails have you thru-hiked? Come back and lecture me on the necessity of carrying a gun on one when you’re as experienced as I am, or as the many experienced backpackers that I took advice from when compiling my gear list.

            Reply
            • Chuck : May 13th

              He doesn’t even mention anything about women… wtf are you on?

              Reply
              • Margaret : May 13th

                I am a woman you twit.

              • Sam Freedom : Jun 25th

                Margaret, he knew you were a woman. Like me, he’s thinking that maybe the previous poster was condescending in general and only a woman would think the condescension was because she was a woman.

            • Justin : Jun 5th

              An AR-15 weighs around 6 lbs, what kind of concealed carry handgun are you toting around? Lol
              Many guns can weigh about 1 lb.

              The argument that you wouldn’t be able to reach your handgun in time because it’s stowed away in your pack doesn’t make sense. People will normally keep it right accessible on their bodies and can conceal it so that nobody around them feels intimidated.

              I understand trying to keep pack weight down as I’ve ruckmarched many times and many long distances in mountain within the French foreign legion, but to go about even leaving a knife out your pack…

              Im sure most if not all of your hikes will be successful without little to no issues with humans or animals.
              However the chance always exists.
              To say black bears are not a threat to humans is just one of the most naive comments I’ve heard in my life.
              They can and will tear you limb from limb if they feel intimidated, if they are feeling territorial, have their Cubs around, or are hungry. Don’t underestimate black bears.

              Nice you to try and put an article together for other hikers but most of your opinions about firearms on the trail just sound like somebody living in a fairy tale world where nothing bad or unfortunate ever happens.
              Not trying to be condescending but your article didn’t make sense throughout every section.

              Reply
              • Margaret : Jun 5th

                Ah yes, written as someone who truly has no experience backpacking.

            • Edward Weurdermann : Sep 5th

              I’m afraid you’ve been mistaken. The majority of responders here pro-guns.
              If you don’t like guns, don’t carry one.

              Reply
          • Orlando : Mar 6th

            Well I will carry when I do the AT I do have a conceal permit also no one on the trail needs to know I’m carrying there are compact guns that don’t weight much

            Reply
        • Marty : Apr 19th

          Necessary? Hopefully not. Guns are like fire extinguishers. You hope you never need one, but if you need one, you’re glad you have one. That said. It’s totally acceptable to choose not to carry one. However, If you did, you should not bury it in your pack. It should be accessible, but concealed. Hope you never need one for obvious reasons. 🙂

          Reply
      • Griz Grizzleton : Jan 7th

        I hiked the entire Appalachian trail with a mini swiss army knife. I used it to cut paracord once and it was mainly used to slice cheese. So yeah. You can easily hike AT without a knife. Some people bring just 1 razorblade. Have you ever thru hiked?

        Reply
        • Frank : Jan 7th

          Wow, look at you, Mr. Eliteist. You’re accomplishment is so amazing.

          Reply
          • James : Jan 29th

            Thats how these people are. It’s disgusting. They’re also known as “gatekeepers”.

            Reply
            • Margaret : Jan 29th

              Woah James. Griz is not a gate keeper. He gave me advice online before I ever got out on the trail and was supportive to many other aspiring through hikers. I was lucky enough that I happened to run into him out on the trail too and he was nothing but kind. He’s not gatekeeping, he’s just pointing out that most people with actual backpacking experience would not be attacking me for this thread. He’s never said that people who carry a gun aren’t real hikers or can’t be on the trail or something.

              Reply
        • Wayne S : Jan 13th

          Ditto the small Swiss Army knife. Used the scissors more than the blade!

          Reply
          • Penrod : May 25th

            But you did use it.

            Back in the 1970s I backpacked around the world, mostly alone, mostly by local bus, some by hiking, some by hitchhiking, and I carried a Swiss Army knife across the US, Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Central, South, and SE Asia. I can’t imagine making that trip without a knife. I used it multiple times a day.

            As for protection, I listened to my gut several times and am glad I did, but there are situations in which one cannot simply walk away: the predator won’t let you. About the same time I was going round the world, a high school acquaintance of mine did some of the same hitchhiking I did in the US: he called home from Santa Fe to say he was on his way to California. He’s never been heard from again. Over forty years ago.

            The problem isn’t that predators are so very common. The problem is that they are predators: they are looking for victims, and some are homicidally violent. People who put themselves in isolated places are well advised to understand that predators are looking for people like them. Some of them are quite charming, and some of them like camping.

            I expect our house will never burn down, not while we own it, not afterwards. Not ever. Am I foolish for having fire extinguishers and fire insurance? Same thing.

            Reply
            • Margaret : May 26th

              But I hiked the entire AT and didn’t use a knife.

              No, but you’d be foolish for keeping an entire firetruck on your property and insisting everyone else should too or they weren’t prepared enough.

              Reply
              • Penrod : May 26th

                Thank you for the reply. I agree that having the fire truck would be overkill, but a fire extinguisher is another thing. Nearly all people go their entire lives without needing a fire extinguisher or fire insurance, but I’m not sure how that makes having either unimportant.

                I can’t get by at home without a knife. I’m perfecting willing to accept that you did so on the AT. It just seems like an experience far different from any wilderness experience I’ve experienced, and yes, I’ve had some in places like northern Pakistan, Jordan, Idaho, and other places without convenient stores and restaurants for frequent resupply.

              • Sam Freedom : Jun 25th

                Thanks to modern advancements, we don’t need a firetruck if we can nip it in the bud w an extinguisher. Same w predators, we don’t need cannons or police if we can nip things in the bud w a compact firearm.

        • Carla Robertson : Jan 13th

          I’m with you, Griz. I also thruhiked by myself with a mini Swiss Army knife and used it to cut salami. I wish that people who weren’t thru hikers would not comment here. There is no need to carry a firearm on the AT. It scares me to think that people are carrying – there are already so many instances of people in regular life accidentally shooting friends and family members who they think are intruders, of firearms accidentally discharging – I would hate to be camped near a jumpy hiker who was holding a gun while they listen to every rustle and strange noise in the woods. Margaret, I am with you and your decision is completely reasonable. This isn’t elitist to not carry a gun or a heavy knife.

          Reply
          • Chad : Jan 14th

            I was going to give a serious response to your comment. Then I read the end of your comment and realized you have zero experience with guns or people who carry guns. You base your entire reasoning on some bs you got from the news or an anti gun politician. I agree you don’t need a gun on the trail but your reasons are complete bs based on phobia. As for a knife I wouldn’t go anywhere without a knife. It not a protection thing it a tool and usefulness thing. I use a knife everyday for all kind of things and could survive weeks with just a knife.

            Reply
          • Louis P : May 24th

            I find it hysterical as well as very ironic that you make fun of people who carry guns and label them as people who “live in fear” while simultaneously shouting that you’re scared of people who carry them and in fear of them?

            This entire subject matter is just stupid. Some people want to carry a gun and some do not. There’s no one here who is wrong or right. No one should be attacking anyone who wants to carry one and no gun carrying people should be making fun of people who wish not to.

            I’m not going to go anywhere without it and it’s just that simple. I carry a Smith and Wesson 38+P , 5 round revolver that’s legendary and weighs??? 14 ounces!!!

            Less than a bottle of water… So please don’t come up with lame reasons like it adds weight because that’s just absurd, or you won’t be able to get to it because it’s in your backpack. Well that’s pretty stupid, and I wouldn’t recommend carrying it in your backpack!!!

            There’s no right or wrong answer here so everyone grow up. But I can absolutely assure you ONE thing and one thing for sure. It will only take ONE time that a group of hikers is being mauled to death by an angry black bear and it’s shot dead by a gun carrying hiker before everyone will change their view…

            Reply
            • Margaret : May 25th

              You’re obviously not a backpacker. There’s not really a comfortable/convenient way to wear a gun/gun belt when you’re wearing a pack. There’s a reason that many people who carry in day to day life don’t carry on the trail.

              Also guns are not the most effective deterrent for an attacking black bear. It’s not as if a hiker has never been mauled by a black bear before, or as if no one has ever shot one. I still am not going to carry on trail. Especially not the AT.

              Reply
              • Justin : Jun 5th

                Loud noises may or may not deter a bear, guess how loud a gunshot is, significantly louder than anybody yelling at a bear.

                To say somebody isn’t a backpacker because you think that there is no way to comfortable wear a sidearm while hiking….good lord.
                Do a checkup on YouTube on the many comfortable ways to carry a sidearm while carrying a pack.
                M’y experience tells me you have no experience hiking with a firearm.

              • Edward Weurdermann : Sep 5th

                It’s ironic that White upper class American women scream about how bad White men are and our guns, yet you call the police when you see a black kid in your neighborhood or call 911 when you back your Volvo station wagon into a tree and who shows up? A White guy with a buzz cut and Oakley’s named Jeff or Mike or Brian trying to sort things out. Hate us, but know you’re just driving a wedge.

          • Daniel : Feb 13th

            Carla your right, they are not all though hikers, let that sink in!!

            Reply
      • Barry chase : Nov 29th

        Unfortunately this is the mindset that’s trying to ruin our country. Liberals and their BS ideas about guns. Screw em. I’m a free American, and I do go armed. 2nd amendment all the way.

        Reply
        • Guntotingliberal : Jul 24th

          Nope. It is your divisive mindset that is ruining our country. Stop screaming about liberals as if we are all one great big giant monolith. We are Americans and we are your fellow citizens and we have the right to our opinions including those of us who own and carry guns.

          Reply
      • JR : Jan 5th

        Agreed. Almost , well not almost
        …EVERY hiker/camper I know would at the very least carry a knife. I’m not going to criticize someone I do not know but I cannot agree with her mindset.

        Reply
      • Scott : Jan 24th

        Having completed the hike, my only issue with not having a knife would be practical. I used mine often, but mostly in regards to food and food prep. As the author states, a gun is just plain heavy. By Vermont we were already eying our 2 liters(4 lbs) of water before climbs. I can’t imagine knowing that I’ve got 5 lbs of useless(in the context of the trail) weight in my bag..

        Wildlife isn’t a safety issue unless you’re looking for it, and sketchy people are easy avoid if they make you uncomfortable.

        My dad and I considered bringing a gun and bear spray. Decided against the gun before we left home, and dumped the spray at Amicalola before the start.

        Reply
    • Trail blue : Jan 6th

      I’ve only done the Ga. part of the AT. But you damn right I and my partner had a gun, extra ammo and a big knife. These remarks about not taking a gun are hilarious. Obviously you anti trail gun people probably don’t even own one. The statement of being in more danger in your home town is correct especially my home town. However if you are trained to be a survivor you know evil can strike anywhere and I stay prepared weather it’s in church or the trail. You must know what you are doing however and have the right mind set to go with what ever weapon you choose. No if you taking a hand gun don’t pack it in the bottom of your pack , that’s useless. I bought a nylon pouch , not a holster that hangs from front of my pack very easy to reach. As far as letting your self get robbed , that’s a lame state of mind. Yea if you inexperienced enough to let someone get the drop on you then yea you might have to go along and pray they don’t kill you and they probably will in that trail setting. Tip, don’t let strangers get close watch their eyes and hands. People aren’t the only threat occasionally there is a rouge black bear. I will say this we were heavy and the 40. Cal Glocks were part of being over weight . By the way they don’t weigh 5 pounds unless you taking a cannon. I will concede the next time I will not take the 40. I will only take my pocket rocket as they are known, which is a tiny .22 cal magnum fits hidden in a closed hand so small. But it will get someone or something off of you in a desperate situation. Oh but yes you do need a weapons carry license at least from your state. But don’t worry about the law keep it hid , don’t show it , it’s there to save your life . Better to be tried by 12 than carried by 6

      Reply
      • Margaret : Jan 6th

        Hike your own hike. I hope you make it back out there soon.

        Reply
        • Gun Hero : Jan 8th

          You can get an AR-15 that weighs 2-3 pounds. Other styles of rifle can be had that weigh less than 5lb. A lot of handguns weigh between 13 to 25 oz (unloaded), well under the purported 5lb weight you claim.

          Reply
          • Gun Hero : Jan 8th

            Kel-Tec offers 4 models under 1lb in weight:
            P-32: 6oz
            P3-AT 8.3oz
            P-11 14oz
            PMR-30 14oz

            And this is just from one manufacturer, there are 100s more. Smith and Wesson offers a nice variety of Air-weight revolvers which fire more powerful rounds than the kel-tecs and weigh in around 14oz.

            Reply
            • Gun Hero : Jan 13th

              Smith and Wesson’s MODEL 340 PD weighs 11oz and fires a 357magnum or 38 special or 38 special +p. Well under 1 pound and could stop a bear.

              Reply
              • Wes : Aug 28th

                Im juzt mostly concerned about the sasquatch have to at least carry 44 mag.

        • Dud : Oct 12th

          I carry concealed on a daily basis and I’ve done a decent amount of backpacking. I realize that this is an oldvarticle but i am embarrassed by what ivd read here.Margaret is entitled to do what she damn well wants to. Some of y’all have gone from providing input to saying that she is somehow stupid for making her own choices, especially as an experienced thru-hiker.

          Reply
    • Reality : Jan 6th

      She’s right. The gun wouldn’t help her in this situation. A gun is just a tool, and with the stated mindset of the blogger, would be useless. You must be willing to kill to protect yourself and your loved ones. Without the will the gun is merely a paperweight. I applaud her sense of self. Just another contender for a shiny Darwin Award.

      Reply
      • oicabuck : Apr 8th

        You are exactly correct this hiker has her mind made up. She already stated she would let herself be robbed. So likely she would roll over and let someone just kill her without a fight as well. Especially without even carting some sort of knife. I see both sides of the gun argument on the at. I will leave that up to the individual but no knife is ludicrous. I personally will carry my small Taurus 38 special. I will also have my small spyderco knife with me on my hike. As a woman my knife is in my pocket every day. Why I would feel naked without it!

        Reply
    • Bereal : Jan 13th

      Lets be real, she is 23, within the first 2 weeks she is going to either fall on a dick and be with that person and group for the rest of the trail.. or fall in with a group of guys that are Hoping!!! she falls on their dick… she wont have to ever “defend herself” because some idiot 18-25 year old dude who trying to get some will “defend” her…. and everyone that has hiked the AT knows its true…… very few single female hikers make it all the way without sleeping with at least one of their fellow hikers.

      There is nothing wrong with being anti gun on the AT, but the reason listed are stupid…

      Guns are Heavy 5lbs – Wrong mine is less then 1.5 pounds

      The Trail is Low Crime- I live in a “low crime” area, last year less then a block away 5 guys broke into a house armed with knifes …. lucky the single lady living there had a gun, she fired 2 shots, missed, but they ran away. Maybe she should of just welcomed them and given them whatever they wanted, even her life. Huge difference between Low Crime and NO Crime

      I Want Other Hikers to Hang out with Me- I carried on my 2012 thru, and for 70 days in the summer of 2014 while on the AT, know how many people knew I had a gun ?? 0, guns aren’t toys they shouldn’t be out for people to see, I had no issues making friends on the trail. If you see someone openly playing with a gun at a camp or shelter LEAVE, and that’s my advice for people armed and unarmed

      They’re Impractical- they are only impractical till you need one…. door lock are impractical….until you need them to stop someone from getting in.

      Reply
      • Carl : May 13th

        Wow, you should be ashamed for this comment.

        Reply
    • Edward Kagan : Jul 13th

      She says a gun weighs 5lbs. That right there shows me how much of a clueless idiot she is. Not even worth trying to educate.

      Reply
    • Nifty : Sep 10th

      What gun weighs 5 lbs???????

      Reply
      • Penrod : May 26th

        A very light rifle or shotgun. In handguns, a Smith & Wesson Model 60 .357 mag revolver with a two inch barrel weighs 19 oz, with a 3 inch barrel 24 oz. A semi-automatic Ruger LCP pistol in .380 weighs 9.4 ounces. Plus ammunition in both cases, but since a gun would be purely for defense, very little need be carried: no fifty round boxes.

        I think the issue here should not be weight but one’s evaluation of the inherent dangers of putting one’s self in isolated places, with only relative strangers around. Different people will come to different conclusions, and personal attitudes have a place in the decision.

        The idea of going for an extended day hike, much less a large portion of the AT without any kind of knife is so far beyond my ken that I have trouble understanding it. I guess the AT must be a linear version of a suburban shopping mall to even consider it. ‘I did it without a knife’ is not the same thing as ‘there is no reason to have a knife’ anymore than is not having medical insurance because you’ve gone years without it.

        Reply
        • Margaret : May 26th

          Why are you even commenting here when you obviously don’t know anything about the Appalachian trail or thru hiking?

          Reply
          • Penrod : May 26th

            People with different experiences bring different perspectives. Experience is transferable to other situations. Your doing the AT without a knife is a very different experience with a different perspective. That’s interesting.

            I’m curious about how you did food prep without a knife. I don’t think I could do it in a camp without a lot of prepared food, probably including freeze dried.

            By the way, my thru trip around the world was with a Jansport book bag with the outer pocket removed, and a sleeping bag. It took me two years and nine months to go from America and return, then back around again as far as India. So, a different sort of experience, but traveling light and long.

            The longest I stayed anywhere was in a small village in Lebanon during the civil war, a bit over two months, with some genuine predators around. At one point a couple guys in a car stopped and offered a Lebanese man $100 to tell me to get in the car with them. That’s well over $400 dollars today. I don’t think they had mere robbery in mind as they had little reason to think I had even that much worth of gear on me.

            So I do have personal experience that you were fortunate not to have. That wasn’t the only experience, and some were in America. There really are predators out there, and not all are simply looking to rob a hiker of relatively trivial amounts of used gear.

            In any case, this is your post. If you really dislike comments from someone with different experience you can delete any or all my comments.

            Reply
            • Margaret : May 27th

              Nah, you don’t get to come back and pretend you were trying to have productive conversation or interested in different perspectives after “the Appalachian trail must be the linear version of a suburban shopping mall to even consider it” it was belittling and dismissive of other people’s accomplishments because they chose to do something differently than you.

              Reply
              • Penrod : May 27th

                You’re right. That was rude. I apologize.

                A 2200 mile trek deserves tremendous respect, and I didn’t give it that. It was surely a life changing experience. Again, I apologize.

    • Louis : Jul 23rd

      Wow is right!!!! When you read something like that it just make you speechless..

      Reply
    • Seth Gunn : Dec 5th

      The author is an idiot millennial.

      Reply
    • Sam : May 21st

      Seriously, this is when I knew the author didn’t have a clue what she was talking about. Waste of time.

      Reply
    • Chance : Jul 31st

      And this statement is absolutely absurd and was obviously written disregarding any type of unbiased research. ” A gun weighs around 5lbs.” My hiking weapon weighs 12 oz. As far as the various laws are concerned, 5 minutes of research will give you all the information you need to legally carry a firearm on the AT, which is not an issue with a lot of CCW’s, except of course for MD, NJ, NY, MA and CT. Perhaps authors should write unbiased articles about issues and concerns in which they have legitimate interest and expertise?

      Reply
    • James : Sep 20th

      It takes a certain kind of person to make condescending conclusions based on ignorance and misinformation then make ad hominem attacks on anyone who tries to educate their uninformed opinion

      Reply
      • Margaret : Sep 20th

        Where exactly are all these as hominem attacks of mine? Or even one?

        Reply
        • Don : Sep 26th

          How many holes can I shoot through The pile of crap & This information that you’ve posted. First off my handgun weighs a little over 3 pounds. And if I can’t handle the extra 3 pounds on any hike then I shouldn’t be on the hike. Number two. I’ll also be carrying a buck knife on my hip is that OK with you. Number three if I go hiking on the trail I’m not going there to meet people and have social events so anyone that wants to as you put it, I don’t remember how you put it. I’ll just say alienate me because I have a handgun with me be my guest I didn’t want to talk to you anyway. Not to mention it looks like you’re getting ready to go hiking with a Rottweiler by your side. Lady you have no right to tell anybody what they should or shouldn’t carry on the trail if you’re going hiking with a Rottweiler or any dog for that matter. But a Rottweiler or pitbull or a big German Shepherd, you and I both know what kind of damage those animals can do to human,, well I know you probably don’t I don’t know which political liberal party you’re spewing all this crap out for you should probably keep it to yourself. You know the old saying people who are afraid of guns should stay home under the table in their glass houses it’s hypocritical for you to walk with a Rottweiler and tell anyone they can’t carry a gun that’s a fact I know you don’t see it have a nice day libby

          Reply
          • Margaret : Sep 26th

            So you don’t know what a rottweiler is, how to tell time, have a reading comprehension of near zero, and have evidently never seen a pack. Got it.

            Reply
    • Barry chase : Nov 29th

      Seriously! If you don’t see how a gun can prevent a kidnapping, then your as stupid as your post.

      Reply
    • Don Leavy : Sep 26th

      She’s going to walk the Appalachian Trail with a Rottweiler and then shake her finger at somebody with a gun yeah OK not to mention I guess she’s never heard of a waistband

      Reply
      • Margaret : Sep 26th

        A rottweiler. That’s hysterical. Almost as funny as you not understanding why someone wouldn’t be wearing a waistband while backpacking.

        Reply
        • GeglashTheGreat : Oct 15th

          How the hell do military units manage to hike through actual untraveled terrain carrying all the same things you do, plus more. And they still manage to carry their weapons.

          Girl, you need to lay off your parents pocketbook and get back to reality.

          Reply
  • Kamakazee : Jan 4th

    I agree about the gun, no reason to carry especially if your not proficient. A knife thou is something I would refuse to go anywhere outdoors without especially hiking. I carry a Morakniv Fixed Blade fieldcraft blade. It has a carbon steel blade, blade measures 3 1/4 inch and weighs only 4 ounces with its sheath. It has multiple uses and only costs around $14.00. I just can’t figure out why anyone would go on a long hike without a minimum of a pocket knife or both a pocket knife and a small fixed blade knife. Even our pioneer ancestors carried a blade at a minimum not only for basic security, but as a essential tool for fieldcraft. Of course if your hiking with a group of people 24/7 on the AT you might not have to worry about carrying a knife for basic security or fieldcraft. You know, making tinder for fires, sharpening a stick for cooking, making a splint, making a tent pole, wood hiking stick, cutting food, etc. 4 ounces extra weight won’t kill you or your impare your hiking fun! It might just save your life at a maximum.

    Reply
    • Margaret : Jan 4th

      I appreciate your concerns, but a blade or pepper/bear spray run into many of the same concerns as a gun in terms of practicality. I’m not going to have them in my hands at all times and they’re likely to be inaccessible should I need them for self-defense. I’ll seek to avoid needing them by being aware of my surroundings instead. I am hiking with my dog and that should be enough deterrent for most people who may wish me ill will. Especially on a trail that sees 2-3 million hikers (many of them female and solo) every year and has had less than 20 reported murders or assaults since the 1970s.

      I do own a carbon steel blade pocket knife, and it was on some early drafts of my gear list but it didn’t make the final cut. Mostly based on suggestions from trail runners and successful thru-hikers. If you look at pack lists it’s not uncommon to forgo a pocket knife, and certainly, I don’t need one that’s more than 3″ long.

      Technology has advanced since the pioneers and I will be carrying a lighter, waterproof matches, and solid fuel tablets.

      4 ounces might not seem like much to you, but I think that kind of mentality is how people end up with 20lbs+ for their base weight. 4oz is 2% of my goal base weight. And considering I’ll be carrying food and water for me and my dog, at least for the first couple hundred miles, that still puts me at around 20lbs for my total pack weight.

      It’s a personal preference, I don’t expect everyone to go without a pocket knife, but I’ve never yet needed one on a camping or backpacking trip.

      Reply
      • Tap : Jan 4th

        Obviously this is a “hike your own hike” thing and it seems like you’ve done a lot of reading, but for what it’s worth I found a knife very helpful on my 2017 NOBO. I’m not a knife guy and don’t carry one on me in everyday life, and I tried to keep my pack light (11 lb base weight) but for cutting cord, opening food, slicing cheese, etc. I was glad I opted to bring one.

        https://www.gerbergear.com/Knives/Folding/US1_31-003040

        It was a well worth the ounce for all of the small encounters it helped out with. Hopefully this doesn’t seem like me trying to complicate one of a thousand decisions you have to make between now and when you start your hike. Like anything else, you can always change it up once you get started. Best of luck to you. Hopefully this year is drier than last year was.

        Reply
      • Maverick : Jan 5th

        Shouldn’t your dog be carrying it’s own food, water, coat, and dog bowls in a pack. I’ve down a handful of trips with my dog and she carries all her own things including a first aid kit for herself in her own pack. We have never done anything in a scale like your aboit to do with the AT (although it is a dream of mine) but she loves to have a pack on. Goodluck to the both of you, and take a knife at the very least. It’s a fantastic tool if nothing else

        Reply
        • Frost : Jan 5th

          Please take a warm pad for your dog to sleep on. I recall a woman who expected her dog (Tucker) to sleep on the cold ground in winter! How about a dog size sleeping bag?

          Reply
          • Margaret : Jan 5th

            Rosco will actually fit into my sleeping bag with me, I chose a wide EE with this in mind.

            Though I must say, it depends on the dog. If I was taking my mom’s lab for example he’d be happy to sleep on the ground in anything but sub zero temperatures.

            Reply
            • John Davies : Jan 6th

              Sleep with your dog? That will be really entertaining when he is soaking wet, muddy and shivering. Have you really thought this part through?

              Reply
              • Margaret : Jan 6th

                Not only have I thought it through I’ve enacted it in the past.

            • Robin : Jan 7th

              Curious, what do you plan to do with your dog when you get to Maine where no dogs are allowed?

              Reply
              • Margaret : Jan 7th

                My mom’s actually coming up to Maine for two weeks to camp, and she’ll take Rosco while I’m hiking Kathadin. But there are also doggie daycares nearby.

        • Margaret : Jan 5th

          Rosco might start carrying a pack later in the trip, but I’m going to carry everything to start and see how he’s handling it first. I figure hiking 10+ miles a day for months on end is different from anything we’ve done before, and since I can reduce his risk of injury while keeping my pack weight well within a safe range I’m going to.

          Reply
      • Greg m : Jan 5th

        Heads up. Dogs aren’t allowed on the Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains. I hike there weekly and on the AT. Back country rangers are present at times on the trail.

        Reply
        • Margaret : Jan 5th

          They’re also not allowed in Baxter State Park.

          Reply
      • Tony : Jan 6th

        The truth is a gun is pretty much useless on a thru hike. The chance of being attacked by a wild animal is almost none existent and you wouldn’t have time to get it out anyway. If a human wants to harm you he’s not gonna meet you at high noon for a gun fight. They would attack you when you had your back turned like evil people always do. Just be careful. Use your common sense just like you do in the real world and you’ll be fine.

        Reply
        • Con Ive : Jan 14th

          What?!? Why do people who don’t carry comment about carrying? When I carry, it’s on my hip concealed by my shirt or jacket. Takes under a fraction of a second to pull from holster. I think the AT is very safe, but…

          Reply
          • Margaret : Jan 14th

            Have you ever done a long distance backpacking trip? Or worn a pack? Why do people who don’t backpack comment on backpacking?

            I’m not commenting on carrying I’m commenting on the fact that I didn’t carry.

            Reply
      • Gordon : Jan 7th

        It is not that you chose not to carry a weapon (which is very reasonable) it is that you employed strawman arguments (with the exception of the weight issue where you instead greatly exaggerated the weight of an adequate firearm) to get to the conclusion you wanted on the matter. Am I correct in assuming that you have never carried a firearm for protection in your short life, not just on this trip? It sure sounds that way.

        Reply
  • Kamakazee : Jan 4th

    Additionally I just wanted to say, there are weird people out there who are smart enough to stay under a radar if their looking to cause dire consequences to a female hiking alone on a wilderness teail with multiple access points, and blogs posted online. There are other things that might and could happen besides being robbed. Security is an ongoing issue no matter where you’re going. As soon as you get complacent, bang, you get had. I think it’s absolutely stupid not to have a minimum of protection along with you be it a blade, or pepper spray.

    Reply
  • Kamakazee : Jan 4th

    Snowflake, good luck! You may regret not carrying a knife.

    Reply
    • Griz Grizzleton : Jan 7th

      If she does she can easily stop at any one of the thousands of towns the trail passes through and buy one. It’s comments like this that make it obvious that the majority of commenters on this thread have never done a long distance hike.

      Reply
      • Frank : Jan 7th

        Similar to how many anti-gun carriers have never been proficient or even knowledgeable with a firearm? or even self defense for that matter? You’re silly.

        Reply
        • Griz Grizzleton : Jan 7th

          I’m silly? I’m a gun owner and am very proficient with fire arms. You make the assumptikn thay because I am anti gun kn trail, that I am in all facets of life. You couldn’t be more wrong. I’ve already thru hiked the AT and am about to do it again. If you’ve never thru hiked the AT, then you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about and are in no position to offer ANY advice on the matter.

          Reply
          • Frank : Jan 10th

            I absolutely can offer an “opinion” on anything without any experience. This site does nothing to vet who posts about what with no back up. Silly.

            Reply
            • Margaret : Jan 10th

              There absolutely is a vetting process for writers and bloggers on this site

              Reply
          • Joe : Sep 18th

            I dont carry a firearm but I do carry a sheath knife and a good multi tool. I’m a fairly large person but I did run into 2 very sketchy guys in Virginia, I kept walking and as soon as I got down into a thick area turned a quick azimuth hunkered down and watch them walk by looking for me . I think lol

            Reply
          • Justin : Jun 5th

            Griz, why is it that every one of your comments ends or starts with the same condescending sentence.

            « You’re obviously not a thru hiker or have never backpacked before »
            Just because somebody has a different mindset and experience than you doesn’t mean they are wrong.
            They’re many ways to compléte any long distance traveling.
            You can do it with, or without firearm protection.
            So far Thé comments I’ve come across as to why you shouldn’t need a firearm are downright misinformed and make it seem like it’s coming from somebody who either knows nothing about small handguns, or from people Who think nothing bad will ever happen to them.
            Being prepared is not living in fear, it’s simply having a piece of mind.

            Reply
            • Margaret : Jun 5th

              For two reasons. 1. It is obvious that most of these commenters aren’t thru hikers. 2. Most of these comments came in after the article was posted on a gun activist website, and are from gun activists not thru hikers.

              Reply
    • Jason : Jan 7th

      If everyone who thru-hiked the AT without a gun were a snowflake, this trail would be snowier than the south pole.

      There have been 11 murders in the history of the AT, despite the fact that 3-4 million people hike the trail in some capacity every year. People have also died due to trees falling on their tent in their sleep. Is your tent tree proof? You can’t prepare for every situation, and not everyone let’s an improbable risk dictate their decisions on gear.

      Reply
      • Frank : Jan 7th

        Those are number since 1974. How many proceed that? Also, how many have occurred since 1990? Not to mention assaults, rape, disappearances under questionable circumstances?

        Better start checking my trees.

        Reply
  • Craig : Jan 5th

    If not carrying a knife, at least consider a Gerber or Victorinox multitool. It will prove invaluable may times every day
    . I also did the 9 to 5 for many years. Then at the age of 40 yrs. I quit work for New Year 1987 and left Canada to live in the Himalayas of Northwestern India and thirty one years later I have enjoyed every moment of every day. Good and bad, it is all an experience. I have learned the True meaning on pure, free, forever!

    Reply
    • Margaret : Jan 5th

      That’s amazing Craig! Sounds like it’s been very satisfying for you.

      I’m likely to carry a small pocket knife I got from my grandmother that has a few tool attachments, just not something I’m carrying with the intent of self defence.

      Reply
      • Tony : Jan 6th

        A good small knife comes in handy. I carry one every where I go. But there’s always someone who has one if you need it. I wish I had a dollar for every time someone used mine to cut a string or open a box. Not a necessity just like to have one.

        Reply