Backpacker Radio #47: Peter Bakwin of FastestKnownTime.com

In today’s episode of Backpacker Radio, we’re joined by Peter Bakwin, co-creator at fastestknowntime.com. We dive deep on all things FKT related, including his take on some of the more controversial FKTs, the proper way to document a speed record, and how he spearheaded this community. We also talk about Peter’s long and impressive background in backpacking and ultrarunning, including his unmatched rock-hard Hard Rock Run. We also have a new unpopular opinion segment, a patent pending, and much more.

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Subjects discussed in the episode include:

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Comments 1

  • Clay Bonnyman Evans : Oct 4th

    Good show, as always. Nice to hear my ol’ pal Peter talk about his many accomplishments.

    Now Badger and Chaunce, I’m going to disagree with you on setting limits for what counts as a “thru hike.” To me, the term simply implies walking a trail, any trail, no matter how long, from start to finish. Seems to me that people who walk the Foothills Trail in South/North Carolina (77 miles) or the Centennial Trail in South Dakota (123 miles) have genuinely accomplished something, even if it’s not a *long* long-distance trail.

    So thru is thru: you hike from beginning to end, or flip and finish, that’s a thru.

    If you want to set limits on what counts as a “long-distance” trail, that makes a little more sense to me.

    Just my opinion, of course.

    ~Pony

    Reply

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