CT-2023?

Drive back to Texas was brutal. Stopped in Lubbock, exhausted, for a night’s stay and access to shower. Threw away gnarly shoes.  If it were not for the snow, ice, need for wheel chains, high clearance, 4 wheel drive vehicle; crushing cost of real estate, heavy winter clothes, taxes, I’d make Summit County home. Was hit hard by heat and humidity in Gulf Coast Texas  summer weather.  Cranked down AC, got mutts,  marveled at electricity, and slept late for days…..

I survived the Hike; did not break anything, fall, get horribly lost, panic, and really loved the wild-flowers.  Here is what I learned:

Altitude sickness limiting.  So is age……mine. 

Get off Trail due to terrible lightening by 2:00 pm. Earlier at higher altitudes.

Always have rain, cold weather gear; gloves, long pants and a Plan D. (A., B. and C. may not pan-out).

I’m decades older than all I saw.  Fellow hikers very friendly.

Freeze dried food useful, ditto H20 and carbon fiber poles.  Nalgene bottles unavailable to clumsy hands; relied on internal bladder. 

Carry dry clothing. Other than meeting human needs; everything else useless. 

Other people more embarrassed about your Nature calls than you.

Improve map n’ compass skills. NEVER rely on cell phone connectivity. 

Stay in shape, work out even more; it was hard enough. 

Be grateful and have an adventurous spirit; stay cheerful and positive. 

There is more; probably not important. Too busy planning next trek.

 

 

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