Pacific Crest Trail Hiker Dies in San Jacinto Mountains; Conditions Called Dangerous

A Pacific Crest Trail hiker died in the San Jacinto Mountains on Friday, March 27, Cal Fire officials said on Twitter.

The hiker, Trevor Laher, slipped on snow-covered ice near Apache Peak (PCT NOBO mile 169.5) while hiking with two friends, according to his father, Doug Laher.

The Pacific Crest Trail Association warned Saturday that conditions in San Jacinto are dangerous, and that several hikers had been rescued in the past 48 hours. Several snowstorms blanketed San Jacinto in the week before Trevor’s death.

“Absolutely do not consider traveling San Jacinto between Spitler Peak Trail (mile 168.5) and Black Mountain Road (mile 191) without ice travel equipment, experience, sound risk assessment knowledge, etc.,” the PCTA said. “The extreme danger is found in multiple places, including near Apache Peak and Fuller Ridge. … It’s quite possible that conditions will get worse in the coming days.”

Cal Fire received a call about 9:38 a.m. PT on Friday, March 27, that a hiker had fallen into a gorge, about 600 feet off the trail.

A California Highway Patrol helicopter  located the hiker’s companions about 11 a.m. ET, but could not land because of poor weather. The helicopter later dropped a rescue team about 1 p.m., but Trevor was dead when the team arrived.

Featured photo courtesy Alexandria Cremer

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Comments 2

  • Russ1663 : Mar 28th

    The backpacking life can only be understood by those who live it. I haven’t thru-hiked, however the feeling of yourself and the time away from the rest of the world cannot be underestimated. I go to local trails alone for the most part. It’s kind of mobile isolation. Perfect when there no sounds but the earth. Take care, stay safe.

    Reply
  • Jena Weeter : Apr 4th

    I commend you for correcting your story by adding Trevor’s name. That was important to his father, my friend, Doug. Stay well and take care.

    Thanks again,
    Jena Weeter

    Reply

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