This Week’s Top Instagram Photos from the #PacificCrestTrail

Ladies, gentlemen, and hiker trash- it has returned.  We are pleased to reintroduce one of our all time favorite series- the top Instagram posts from the Pacific Crest Trail.

Each week, we peruse all of the wonderful pictures from Instagram using the hashtag #TrekthePCT and #PacificCrestTrail and select a few of the best to highlight for your viewing pleasure!

This week we take a look at photos snapped between 10/11/17 – 10/24/17

If you would like your picture to be included, be sure to use the hashtag #TrekthePCT and/or tag us. Don’t forget to follow The Trek for all things long-distance backpacking and The Trek: Pacific Crest Trail for even more PCT love.

This Week’s Top Photos from the Pacific Crest Trail

We had camped a few miles past Tuolumne Meadows near a flooded meadow. What was normal placid middling stream was now a wide river thanks to the heat wave and all the snow melt. It had been a beautiful campsite. The next morning, we woke up before the sun and had just left camp when we passed a mound of granite on our right. It was more of a hill than a mountain and it was barren except for the poor tree struggling towards the sky from a small crack in the rock. It took us about 2 seconds to drop our packs and then we were scrambling up the slope. It was steeper than we thought and we were breathing a little heavier than we would like to admit when we reached the top. Our breath caught in our throats, however, as we spun around looking at the 360 degree views. Finally, we settled on the view of the flooded meadow we camped next to last night and watched the sun slowly light up the scene.

A post shared by Owen Rojek (@timeforahike) on

"Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup; You put water into a bottle it becomes the bottle; You put it in a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water my friend." – Bruce Lee * Meticulous calculations turning into thoughtless rhythme, entrancing the body in a state of effortless flow. The outsider sees steps, but the experiencer sees nothingness. This is the difference between the witness and the experiencer of immersion; one interprets every step in a logical sequence and the other separates from the procedural accounting. The former perspective is cautious and quantifiable, whereas the latter is an elaborate composition made up of infinite trust falls. Martial artists feel the fight, musicians feel the music, runners feel the terrain, public speakers feel the audience. Receive, feel, adapt. Implicitly, anything opposing flow is coercion and as everyone knows, formally or experientually, "for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction." Exhibits A-D Fighter: forces a jab and gets caught Musician: forces a note and creates chop Runner: forces a stride and loses momentum Public Speaker: forces a tone and reduces audience reception * But running around and banging your head on things is cool, too. I mean, how are you to know if you're at equilibrium unless you tip the scale and how would you know where your wave lies on the scale unless you, every so often, "crash?" * Also, since coming home, I've rekindled with a lot of people struggling. Life flows and it crashes…it doesn't happen "to you" – it happens "with you." Just enjoy the ride, laugh, and adapt to its ebb and flow. All's good. * * * * #trekthepct#pct2017#pctig#pcta#pctthruhike#thruhiking#beactive#gopro#rei1440project#ig_sky#backpacking#getlost#ig_shotz#theTrek#sky_captures#thruhike#discoverearth#hikingtrail#getoutside#optoutside#pacificcresttrail#trek#trekking#travelwashington#pct#goprophotography#goprohero#brucelee#philosophy

A post shared by Andrew Stevens (@andrews74434) on

Trying out capture one 10 for editing. Gotta say. It's way faster than lightroom

A post shared by Niclas Brundell (@niclasbrundell) on

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