PCT 2017 Photos to Get You Excited For 2018

As a photographer, hiking the PCT is more than a dream come true.  You always have incredible views and beautiful people at your photographic disposal.  Sometimes the trail is so insanely beautiful that you can take award-winning photographs with your smart phone/point-and-shoot.  Stalking other hikers on Instagram is intriguing for the mere fact that even the untrained photographer can capture such stunning memories.  Instagram is a great platform to see how other hikers see the trail and what they choose to photograph.  Personally, as a hiker, I also wonder exactly what was going on that day, that hour and in that moment of their capture.

Whether you’re out hiking this year or not, here is some hiker trash-eye candy for your viewing pleasure from the PCT Class of 2017.



I got to talk about #afewofmyfavoritethings today… why the PCT (and like experiences) can be #lifechanging. #whywilderness? •••••••••• 🐐🏔 mile 2290 #MtRainier 👋🏼 #PCT2017 📷 Canon EOS Rebel XS SLR Film Camera 🎞 Kodak #Ektar100 35mm Color Neg Film •“Are you going ALONE?”• The number one ☝🏼 question I field before, during and after each trek… This is the greatest concern for many. How many times do we opt out of something we’re interested in for fear of going alone? In college, I can remember having a keen interest in learning to salsa dance…💃🏽 But no one would go with me initially to try it out. I can remember sitting in my car outside of an event for 20 mins just trying to work up the nerve to go in by myself. Once I even decided it was easier to just drive back to the sanctuary of my dorm room(30 mins away). Can you believe that?? Yet, it happens all of the time! #relate Some worry about safety. 🦁🐯&🐻… 🙊 You know, “safety in numbers.” For me, truthfully this question of whether or not I will go alone hits the nerve of my deep felt need for Love & Belonging. #MaslowsHierachyofNeeds Who will go with me?? 🤷🏼‍♀️ Despite the fear of loneliness, each time I #goitalone, pushing through this nervous unknowing, I am met with an incredibly rich #community and the overwhelming #support from my friends and family(who many not be physically “near,” but are with me, and draw nearer still through it all). It takes that initial willingness to #putyourselfoutthere. Vulnerability begets, authentic community. And vice versa. [continued in comments]

A post shared by ☀️ne 🌙ay (@onedayontheway) on






On top of Mt. Thielsen! #oregon #pct

A post shared by Catherine Trainor (@cathykatya) on




478 / Casa de Luna 📷@na_diagram

A post shared by Andrew Rogers (@stealthmullet) on





This is why I don't cowboy camp. #thetrek #trekthepct

A post shared by Zach Davis (@zrdavis) on
















Soulshine & Nirvana do Forester Pass. 13,200ft! 🏔📸 @naturemonsterr

A post shared by Alexandria Cremer (@alexandriasadventure) on




Oooof this photo. Today I came across my PCT shirt in my parent’s garage, and was gifted a stomach-churning sense of nostalgia. Stained, frayed, and still a little weighty with salt, this T-shirt had a lot of stories to tell. As I stood in some shiny new shoes, it reminded me a few I had forgotten (One time I tried to drink concentrated fruit punch Mio when I didn’t have any water. I spit it up and stained my shirt a nice blood color (hardcore! 🤘)). Through an article of clothing, I was able to shake hands with oddly significant memories, and that’s something I can’t take for granted. Memories are a miracle. Fabric doubles as a time machine. Stains (and scars) tell stories. Our brains create. We are so, so well designed. – #trekthepct #andrewshike #pct2017

A post shared by Andrew Glenn (@andrewglenn_) on




Road walkin'. Desperate times call for desperate measures.

A post shared by Dillon Ricketts (@dillonsits) on













Trail Squad #pct #pct2017

A post shared by Jesus Celis (@speedy.jesus) on








Sitting in Washington, watching Oregon burn! 🔥 #pct2017 #mexicotocanada

A post shared by Jess (@hikingdiaries) on





Hey I'm a duck 🦆

A post shared by Joey Williams (@aestheticsbyjoey) on





















Kennedy Meadows – a place I've been imagining for months. Here, in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada in California, hikers gather to prepare for a sudden change in conditions. After 700 miles of arid desert, the trail will soon ascend in to the highest range in the contiguous US. These mountains have had record-breaking snowfall this year, which will make summiting passes and crossing rivers slow and sometimes treacherous. There is a buzz of excitement (and nerves) as hikers update their gear – (for example, I swapped my sun umbrella for an ice axe) and make plans to group together to tackle the challenge. Also, whenever large groups of hikers get together around a fire, there is a lot of laughing and a lot of beer. Good times. #pacificcresttrail

A post shared by Rachel Coffey (Pony Express) (@hiker_rach) on













WHAT A CRAZY FEW DAYS! So I hiked to Snoqualmie Pass on Friday and then spent the weekend in Seattle with one of my really good friends. He drove me back to the trail Sunday and as I was sitting around working up the courage to hike out, another trail friend told us he flipped a coin and decided to drive 8 hours to Idaho to see the total eclipse, and invited us to join. Everyone knows I LOVE a good side quest, and many of my favorite memories from thru-hiking come when I'm not on the trail at all. So I said HELL YEAH. 5 of us piled in his van, drove all night to the Sawtooths, slept for an hour, and then woke up at sunrise to hike up to this lake and get a good spot for the eclipse. Experiencing 2 minutes of eclipse totality was UNREAL but I'll post more about that later. For now I just want to brag about this amazing freaking spot where I got to spend several hours today. Now we're in Boise getting food and slowly (tiredly) making our way back to the trail in Washington. Life is so fun and weird and I freaking love it!

A post shared by nadia westenburg • "furball" (@na_diagram) on




And here are the girls.

A post shared by Isko Salminen (@iskosalminen) on







A post shared by Paul Barach (@barachoutdoors) on





















Affiliate Disclosure

This website contains affiliate links, which means The Trek may receive a percentage of any product or service you purchase using the links in the articles or advertisements. The buyer pays the same price as they would otherwise, and your purchase helps to support The Trek's ongoing goal to serve you quality backpacking advice and information. Thanks for your support!

To learn more, please visit the About This Site page.

What Do You Think?