Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 Tent Review [Video]

I switched to the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 this season after using the Copper Spur Platinum as my semi-freestanding tent for the past few years. The Copper Spur has the same interior space as the Platinum, and I’ve found it to be more durable. It has a weight penalty of seven ounces (two pounds, 12 ounces vs. two pounds, five ounces) but I’m such a train wreck in the backcountry that I needed something a bit beefier. In the video, we go over the specs and design of the Copper Spur, compare it to the Platinum and Tiger Wall, and show the livable space. Yes, I know everyone in my videos is roughly the same size, but hopefully it’ll give you an idea of what the interior space looks like.

Here’s the video (sorry the audio cuts a bit), and I have more details on the Copper Spur HV UL 2 below.

Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2 At-a-Glance

MSRP: $450
Weight: Two pounds, 12 ounces
Category: Semi-freestanding
Peak Height: 40 inches
Interior Space: 29 square feet; vestibules are nine square feet

Notes: The Copper Spur has two side entrances and generous vestibules. It pitches with eight stakes. The package comes with the tent body, fly, four-way hub pole system, and stakes.

Materials and Features

This tent is lightweight for the livable space, thanks to smart design and material choice. It’s plenty comfortable for two people and pitches quickly.

The rainfly and floor are silicon-treated ripstop nylon with a waterproof coating, and the walls are polyester mesh. The whole tent is seam-sealed and sets up with eight stakes. Zippers are easy to use, but watch for them getting caught in the fly. It hasn’t been as big of an issue as it was with the Platinum, but when the tent gets wet, you do need to zip with care.

The Copper Spur has two side interior pockets for organizing small gear items and one overhead pocket. It also has multiple options for securing the fly to the poles and rolling the doors up for added ventilation and views.

Livable Space

copper spur HV UL 2 maggie slepian tent space

Livable space is where the Copper Spur stands out, and what makes it worth the few extra ounces. There is plenty of shoulder space thanks to the steep walls and spreader bar, which makes this tent fine for two people. At 40 inches tall with 29 square feet of interior space, it’s not a big stretch to have two people living in here for an extended hike, and it’s easy to get in and out of. The update to this tent increased the interior space by 20%, which means it’s easier to sit up and change clothes, as well as to keep your sleeping bag away from the tent walls.

This isn’t the lightest tent on the market, but for the space, ease of use, and design, the Copper Spur is luxurious for a tent under three pounds. When I’m hitting bigger miles and packing lighter, I will usually take a trekking pole tent, but for splitting the weight with a partner and the few extra ounces, the Copper Spur is my go-to this season and it’s easy to see why it continually stays at the top of thru-hiker fave lists.

Comparable Two-Person Backpacking Tents

copper spur HV UL 2 maggie slepian exterior

Big Agnes Copper Spur Platinum

MSRP: $600
Weight: 2 pounds, 5 ounces
Livable Space: 29 square feet, two nine-foot vestibules

Big Agnes Tiger Wall 2

MSRP: $400
Weight: 2 pounds, 8 ounces
Livable Space: 28 feet of interior space, two eight-foot vestibules

Big Agnes Fly Creek 2

MSRP: $350
Weight: 2 pounds, 5 ounces
Livable Space: 28 feet of interior space, one eight-foot vestibule

NEMO Dagger 2

MSRP: $400
Weight: 3  pounds, 5 ounces
Livable Space: 31.5 feet of interior space, two 11.4- square-foot vestibules

Related

This item was donated for purpose of review.

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